How 'Baha'i Diplomacy' and 'Baha'i Wisdom' works ?




Here is information from the manual on public affairs published by the NSA of the US. I have highlighted areas that might help you with your concerns:
CONTACT WITH GOVERNMENT AGENCIES AND OFFICIALS

Regarding Bahá’í Matters

The relationships between the Bahá'í community and the government are the responsibility of the elected institutions of the Faith. Local Spiritual Assemblies are responsible for Bahá'í contact with local government agencies and officials (city councils, mayors, etc.) and, where appropriate, with local representatives to the state legislature. The National Spiritual Assembly, through its Washington, D.C., Office of Public Affairs, is responsible for all Bahá'í contact with federal or state government agencies and officials (the president, the State Department, senators, congressional representatives, governors, state government agencies, etc.). Bahá’ís who wish to contact government agencies or officials on Bahá'í matters or to mention or discuss the Bahá'í Faith must first ask the appropriate Bahá'í institution for permission.
The National Spiritual Assembly occasionally requests that Local Spiritual Assemblies or individual Bahá'ís contact federal or state government officials to ask their assistance on a particular issue that the Bahá'ís have chosen to promote. In these instances, Bahá'ís should call or write their legislators on behalf of the Bahá'í Faith, being mindful to refrain from quoting the Bahá'í writings or using the opportunity to teach the Faith. Meeting with Government Officials Regarding Bahá'í Matters here may be times in meetings when local Bahá'ís will discuss the Faith in response to questions from a government official, but it is important to exercise caution to ensure that the official does not develop the impression that the Bahá'ís’ visit and proposals are only a means of teaching the Faith. Local Bahá'ís engaged in public affairs work will have to gauge each situation on its merits, determining what and how much information on the Faith to share in a given meeting. They will make these determinations with increasing ease as their experience grows.
REFERENCE: Bahá'í International Community, External Affairs Manual – Bahá'í Diplomacy, p. 32.

Regarding Non-Bahá’í Matters

Of course, Bahá’ís can contact government representatives and express their views on non-Bahá’í matters as their consciences dictate, provided they do so as an individual and do not identify themselves as Bahá’ís.
Participation in Petitions and Letter Writing Campaigns
The believers are free as citizens to sign petitions or write letters to bring certain matters to the attention of the public and public officials. However, they should not identify themselves as Bahá’ís, unless encouraged to do so by a Bahá’í institution. The decision to participate in the myriad petitions and letter-writing campaigns in progress at any given time is largely left to the individual, to be made in accordance with his or her understanding of the teachings and the dictates of his or her conscience. However, if the friends have questions about particular issues or initiatives, they are encouraged to contact the appropriate institution for guidance — the Local Spiritual Assembly for local petitions and campaigns, and the National Spiritual Assembly’s Office of Public Affairs for national or international petitions and campaigns.

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